How Does Hair Grow: The Hair Growth Cycle Explained

How Does Hair Grow: The Hair Growth Cycle Explained

Viviscal brings you an explanation of the phases of the hair growth cycle. We explain why hair loss happens and what is a normal amount to lose on a daily basis.

To understand how hair grows, let’s look at the different phases of the natural hair growth cycle. The cycle starts with the antigen or growing phase a new wispy hair, like baby hair, emerges from the follicle and pushes out the old hair. Growth signals and nutrients start to enter the hair through the bloodstream and a hair strand grows healthy and strong. The anagen phase can last between two and seven

years. This is when the hair is attached to the dermal papilla.

The longer this phase lasts, the longer your hair will grow. As we get older the anagen phase gets shorter.

So hair may become thinner after each cycle.

We then enter the catagen phase which is the transitional stage that lasts about 10 days.

This is when the hair detaches from the dermal papilla, which takes us into our telogen phase or resting stage. This phase lasts about three months and as the old hair is no longer attached to its blood supply, it can’t be repaired and can appear dull and lifeless. Another new, wispy hair emerges from the follicle and pushes out the old hair and the whole cycle starts again. Around 15% of your hairs are in the telogen phase,

that’s why you shed hairs all the time.

Your head of hair is made up of about a hundred and fifty thousand follicles. Around 85% are in the anagen, or growing phase, at any one time. So it’s normal to shed an average of a hundred hairs per day. If, however, you’re shedding more than a hundred hairs a day, or if you notice your hair getting thinner and lifeless,

it could be due to a number of factors – from poor diet and stress, to age, hormonal changes, or medication – and you may wish to seek medical advice.

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